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Castle (Season 2, Episode 22-22) & Bones (Season 5, Various Episodes) – 

It strikes me that both of these show have male protagonists that would willingly and happily be involved with their female counterparts, but the women for various reasons choose not to be with them.

To be sure, there is nothing wrong with that. But these shows are designed around their leads eventually getting together. Why does it take so long? Is it a fear by the writers and show runners that if these characters consummated their respective relationships, the show would end? Last time I checked, marriage didn’t end lives. (That is unless you actively don’t like the person you’re married too.)

Castle and Bones would rather run their characters through the gauntlet of unnecessary relationship-like scenarios for the audience to see ‘what it’d be like if they were to date’. This generally tedious trend eventually leads to childishness.

One thing the shows tend to do is find incredibly convoluted ways to keep the characters separated:

Bones does it with ‘trust’ issues. See Bones’ father and mother ran away, so she doesn’t trust that Booth won’t do the same thing, though he’s been around for 5 years with her, and utterly devoted to her for at least 3 of those years. But still… Ugh. Though, the tactic of keeping them separate has changed. In the beginning of the show, the show was insistent that they couldn’t be together because it crossed the line of love and work. This argument, though intriguing, has been tossed aside. Though, it cleared a path for something, let’s say, stupider.

Castle does it with claiming that Richard Castle is a playboy who exploits can be read on Page 6, so Detective Beckett is concerned that he might be a douche. Fine. But in 2 Seasons, we’ve seen nothing that would suggest that he’s ever done anything that crazy, except marry poorly. (But if Castle marries badly, date him, don’t marry him.) Never mind the fact that he’s raising a remarkable intelligent child who loves and respects him, and he supports his mother. Those things, while understandably irksome baggage, are not necessarily deal breakers.

Another incredibly disheartening tactic that both of these show engage in is scenes in which the adults act like children and children act like adults. This is stupid.

More examples:

Castle: Richard Castle’s daughter (she’s 16 or 17) treats her dad like he’s a child for not letting her study music with her hunky new teacher alone in her room. The scene and dialogue play out so that Castle is presented to be in the wrong. She is even backed-up by her grandmother who basically tells Castle that he’s being inconsiderate. (He even apologizes for being over sensitive.) Why are we suppose to side with Castle’s daughter?

While Bones doesn’t do the same thing with it’s primary characters, its supporting cast is not so lucky. Tamara Taylor (Dr. Saroyan), whose character is raising a foster daughter, is forced to act out scenes that can only be described as writer cute*. In this case, Dr. Saroyon’s daughter is going to the gynecologist for the first time and the doctor is hot. The Gyno doc asks Dr. Saroyaon out, after examining the daughter (all sorts of ick) and she goes around her daughters back for a date. The daughter finds out, and has to be the bigger person and let’s her step-mom go out with him. WHAT? And did I mention ick?

Why is it so hard to have characters date on network shows in primetime?

But in TV land there are shows that would rather the characters act like adults (Thank God!) and are able to survive. Look at Justified: Raylan and Ava (euphemism), and the show deals with the consequences of that rash but very human decision. It, in fact, drives the drama.

See sometimes drama isn’t the construction of events, but how direct actions can reverberate through others.

*Writer Cute – I can only describe as something written that no human would ever do, and whose sole purpose, it seems, is to be a cute juxtaposition of a something that could happen.

Castle and Bones would rather run their characters through the gauntlet of unnecessary relationship-like scenarios for the audience to see ‘what it’d be like if they were to date’. This eventually leads to childishness.

One thing the shows tend to do is find incredibly convoluted ways to keep the characters separated:

Bones does it with ‘trust’ issues. See Bones’ father and mother ran away, so she doesn’t trust that Booth won’t do the same thing, though he’s been around for 5 years with her, and utterly devoted to her for at least 3 of those years. But still… Ugh. Though, the tactic has changed. In the beginning of the show, it seemed that they couldn’t be together because it crossed the line of love and work. This argument, rightly, has been tossed aside. Though, it cleared a path for something, let’s say, stupider.

Castle does it with claiming that Richard Castle is a playboy who exploits can be read on Page 6, so Detective Beckett is concerned that he might be a douche. Fine. But in 2 Seasons, we’ve seen nothing that would suggest that he’s ever done anything that crazy, except marry poorly. (But if Castle marries badly, either don’t marry him.) Never mind the fact that he’s raising a remarkable intelligent child who loves and respects him, and he cares for his mother enough to give her a roof over her head. Those things, while understandable as slightly irksome baggage, are not necessarily deal breakers.

One incredibly disheartening tactic that both of these show engage in is scenes in which the adults act like children and children act like adults. This is stupid.

More examples:

Castle: Richard Castle’s daughter (she’s 16 or 17) treats her dad like he’s a child for not letting her study music with her hunky new teacher alone in her room. The scene and dialogue play out so that Castle is presented to be in the wrong. She is even backed-up by her grandmother who basically tells Castle that he’s being inconsiderate. (He even apologizes for being over sensitive.) Why are we suppose to side with Castle’s daughter?

While Bones doesn’t do the same thing with it’s primary characters, its supporting cast is not so lucky. Tamara Taylor (Dr. Saroyan), whose character is raising a foster daughter, is forced to act out scenes that can only be described as writer cute*. In this case, Dr. Saroyon’s daughter is going to the gynecologist for the first time and the doctor is cute. The Gyno doc asks Dr. Saroyaon out (all sorts of ick) and she goes around her daughters back for a date. The daughter finds out, and has to be the bigger person and let’s her step-mom go out with him. WHAT? And did I mention ick?

But in TV land there are shows that would rather the characters act like adults (Thank God!) and are able to survive. Look at Justified: Raylan and Ava fuck, and the show deals with the consequences of that rash but very human decision. It, in fact, drives the drama.

See sometimes drama isn’t the construction of events, but how direct actions can reverberate through others.

Glee (Season 1, Second Act) – I really enjoyed the first part of Season 1, but the show is quickly getting formulaic. At this point, I don’t see a reason to watch anything but the songs. (Which haven’t improved on the originals, at least not lately.)

*Writer Cute – I can only describe as something written that no human would ever do, and whose sole purpose, it seems, is to be a cute juxtaposition of a something that could happen.

Castle and Bones would rather run their characters through the gauntlet of unnecessary relationship-like scenarios for the audience to see ‘what it’d be like if they were to date’. This eventually leads to childishness.

One thing the shows tend to do is find incredibly convoluted ways to keep the characters separated:

Bones does it with ‘trust’ issues. See Bones’ father and mother ran away, so she doesn’t trust that Booth won’t do the same thing, though he’s been around for 5 years with her, and utterly devoted to her for at least 3 of those years. But still… Ugh. Though, the tactic has changed. In the beginning of the show, it seemed that they couldn’t be together because it crossed the line of love and work. This argument, rightly, has been tossed aside. Though, it cleared a path for something, let’s say, stupider.

Castle does it with claiming that Richard Castle is a playboy who exploits can be read on Page 6, so Detective Beckett is concerned that he might be a douche. Fine. But in 2 Seasons, we’ve seen nothing that would suggest that he’s ever done anything that crazy, except marry poorly. (But if Castle marries badly, either don’t marry him.) Never mind the fact that he’s raising a remarkable intelligent child who loves and respects him, and he cares for his mother enough to give her a roof over her head. Those things, while understandable as slightly irksome baggage, are not necessarily deal breakers.

One incredibly disheartening tactic that both of these show engage in is scenes in which the adults act like children and children act like adults. This is stupid.

More examples:

Castle: Richard Castle’s daughter (she’s 16 or 17) treats her dad like he’s a child for not letting her study music with her hunky new teacher alone in her room. The scene and dialogue play out so that Castle is presented to be in the wrong. She is even backed-up by her grandmother who basically tells Castle that he’s being inconsiderate. (He even apologizes for being over sensitive.) Why are we suppose to side with Castle’s daughter?

While Bones doesn’t do the same thing with it’s primary characters, its supporting cast is not so lucky. Tamara Taylor (Dr. Saroyan), whose character is raising a foster daughter, is forced to act out scenes that can only be described as writer cute*. In this case, Dr. Saroyon’s daughter is going to the gynecologist for the first time and the doctor is cute. The Gyno doc asks Dr. Saroyaon out (all sorts of ick) and she goes around her daughters back for a date. The daughter finds out, and has to be the bigger person and let’s her step-mom go out with him. WHAT? And did I mention ick?

But in TV land there are shows that would rather the characters act like adults (Thank God!) and are able to survive. Look at Justified: Raylan and Ava fuck, and the show deals with the consequences of that rash but very human decision. It, in fact, drives the drama.

See sometimes drama isn’t the construction of events, but how direct actions can reverberate through others.

*Writer Cute – I can only describe as something written that no human would ever do, and whose sole purpose, it seems, is to be a cute juxtaposition of a something that could happen.

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